search instagram arrow-down

Why “Schoolhouse Rock” Matters

The phrase “knowledge is power” is often attributed to Frances Bacon, from his Meditationes Sacrae (1597).

In the 1970’s, an animated children’s television series that aired on Saturday mornings on ABC, adopted the slogan “Knowledge is power.” The series was called, Schoolhouse Rock! The themes that were covered included: grammar, science, economics, history, mathematics, and civics.

History of the Show

In the early 1970’s, David McCall an advertising executive, noticed his young son was struggling to learn his multiplication tables, despite being able to memorize the lyrics of every single Rolling Stone’s song. 

Therefore, McCall came up with the brilliant idea to hire Bob Dorough to write a song that would teach multiplication to children, which became “Three Is a Magic Number.” Tim Yohe was an illustrator who worked with McCall at his advertising agency and was hired to create the visuals that accompanied the song.

In 1973, McCall pitched the series to ABC Vice President (Michael Eisner), and cartoon director (Chuck Jones).

The rest is history.

Why Does Schoolhouse Matter?

The Saturday morning cartoon was a staple for every child who grew up in the 70’s and 80’s. 

As an adult, I have fond memories of watching the program as a child, and I still remember their catchy lyrics. From learning how a “Bill” was passed in Congress, to understanding my multiplication facts in their  “Figure 8” episode. 

The series brilliantly communicated complex subject matters in a creative, imaginative, and entertaining manner.

Therefore, I would say, “Schoolhouse Rock!” embodied the slogan, Knowledge is power”, and left a lasting legacy to millions of children across the United States. 

Have you ever watched “Schoolhouse Rock!”? If so, what is your favorite episode?

4 comments on “Why “Schoolhouse Rock” Matters

  1. Math Sux says:

    I didn’t grow up with the show but have seen it as a student and still remember those songs! Such a great show and a way to teach.

    https://mathsux.org/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I believe you can watch some of the episodes on Youtube for free, or you can purchase separate seasons on Amazon Prime. If you have children, the series is an excellent educational tool.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Laura Vargas Ferreira says:

    I have never watched this show but I have heard about it from people I know. I would totally try to check it out!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. When you get a chance, you should try watching free episodes on Youtube, or you can purchase different seasons on Amazon Prime. The episodes are fun, silly, educational, and once you’ve listened to the music, you won’t be able to get it out of your head!

    Like

Leave a Reply
Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: